Macbeth returns to the stage

Michelle+Bok+%2811%29+who+plays+Katniss+falls+to+the+ground+in+horror+after+receiving+the+message+that+her+family+has+been+killed.+

Jordan Kim

Michelle Bok (11) who plays Katniss falls to the ground in horror after receiving the message that her family has been killed.

Jordan Kim, Managing Editor

Walking down the hallways of the high school building, many would have heard sounds of splendid soliloquies flowing out of the auditorium or the atrium over the past couple of weeks. From Nov. 11-18, English 11 students performed creative reinterpretations of “Macbeth.” In groups, Junior students planned a few scenes from scratch, designing purposeful costumes, props, and language to go along with the performance. 

Various interpretations employing themes ranging from Bokjeong Mafia groups to the Aladdin musical made their way onto the stage. The sheer amount of effort that students poured into preparing their productions was evident as many masterfully memorized complex lines and mesmerized the audience. 

“I was both pleasantly surprised and thoroughly impressed by the quality of the work that students put on stage,” Tessa Alden, English 11 teacher, said. “Every single group had a strong component within their performance: either the richness of the dialogue, the flamboyance of the costumes, or the clever use of the stage space.”

In particular, the actors and actresses preserved the dramatic elements of “Macbeth” through lively action, which drew both awe and laughter. For instance, some performers sprayed glasses of water on each other to show the wrath of Macbeth, and others depicted the scene of Macbeth’s death by covering his shirt with red paint. 

“The live aspect of the performance was what made these so spectacular. It allowed for a plethora of creative improvisations and dynamic actions that drew in the audience,” Mrs. Alden added. 

For the students, by consuming Shakespeare’s iconic play “Macbeth” in the manner that the playwright intended, many were able to see Shakespeare in a new light. Shakespeare’s language and literary eloquence may appear dense and incomprehensible at first sight, but activities like these are truly unique opportunities for students to enter the beautiful world of production and plays.